Almost 20 years On…

You stood on the shoulders of geniuses to accomplish something as fast as you could, and, before you even knew what you had, you patented it, you packaged it, and you slapped it on a plastic lunchbox and you’re selling it; you wanna sell it. – Ian Malcom

The new Jurassic Park game looks like ass.

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15 thoughts on “Almost 20 years On…

  1. Initially I thought, “Oh, so the team from Sega that made the Iron Man games were brought together to make a poor Jurassic Park game.” It’s Telltale though? Disappointing.

    1. To be fair to the animators, the Movie T-Rex (MT-R) only did exactly what the director needed it to do. It looked amazing. But so do the facades of houses in old Westerns.
      The Videogame T-Rex (VT-R) needs to be dimensionally comprehensive and capable of thousands of potential articulations dictated by what is essentially a randomization generator (gamers), and not choreographed by a director.

      The dragons in Skyrim don’t look as good as the JPMT-R, and they’re operating with software many generations after.

      I always give Videogame graphics as much rope as I give improv scenes. So long as it works in the moment, I’m not going to complain.

      Final point, and this is for my own curiosity: Wasn’t the JPMT-R a robot/puppet? In the final scene, yeah, that’s digitally animated, but the reason the JPMT-R looks so good in our imagination (and while we’re watching the action scenes) is due to the level of detail we witness in the early close-ups of the model. Our brain retains that degree of realism (on an emotional level: fear and belief) as we watch the later T-Rex scenes.

      1. The T-Rex in Jurassic Park was a careful mix of puppet and CG. Obviously the wide shots are CG: when she escapes from the pen (one of the most memorable shots in movie history;) when she eats Gennaro; the galimimus kill; and the ending. There are also obvious puppet moments for the T-Rex: when she nudges the car; when she looks into the window, when she roars over the cliff. But there are plenty of scenes where the two are so well mixed, in close-up and wide shot, that the mind never bothers to question the material of the creature.

        Watch these two scenes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5Co3A3fLBo

        Start this one at about 2:00: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTWo9oLJOWk&feature=relmfu

        In the first clip, even as a kid, I noticed a difference in the T-Rex when Grant first pulls out the flare and when he throws it. That’s one of the more obvious mixes of the puppet and CG. Instead, look at the Rex when she bumps the car with her nose, and then when she tips it over. Look in the last clip when the Rex bites the raptor. These are close-up uses of CG that don’t feel unreal at all. I bet many of the close-ups you recall in your memory aren’t puppetry.

        As for videogames: yes. They have to account for an ever changing world-set. The graphics have to be re-rendered every fraction of a second, and they have to react to in-game stimuli, instead of pre-rendering the graphics in a steady shot (or a moving shot which has a definite and predictable path.) Pre-rendered graphics are what made Final Fantasy 7-9, and the early Resident Evil games so successful, aesthetically. If graphics are pre-rendered, the game uses a fraction of the computer’s processing power, and you can have a more detailed and complicated image.

        That said, I dare you to make a side by side comparison of Skyrim and this new Jurassic Park game and tell me Jurassic Park looks like a modern game, and not some hack, Wal-Mart clearance bin trash: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjqsYzBrP-M

      2. I don’t think it’s quite fair to compare the graphics of JP, which is a console game, to Skyrim, a PC game. The graphic capabilities of PC games usually far surpass console games, due to programers of console games learning just how far they can push processing powers of the various consoles with each subsequent game.

        My disappoint with the game is that, like Iron Man that I referenced above, they are trying to cram in moments from the movies while creating a new experience for the player. I hold out little hope for this title and expect it to be a fantastic failure.

  2. “I bet many of the close-ups you recall in your memory aren’t puppetry. ”

    Easiest money I’ll ever make. The bet is on, sir!

    Also, I never compared Skyrim to the JP videogame graphics. No, sir. Never did I. I’m comparing Skyrim dragons to JPMT-R.

    Is there any game, even a PC game, that has in-game graphics comparable to JP? Just curious. I doubt it.

  3. That was more directed at Scott’s bargain bin comment.

    This JP game also has a long history of gaming excellence to live up to.

  4. Kosmo:

    Personal computers still out-power a console, but the gap isn’t as severe as it was 15 years ago. Also, Skyrim is a console as well as a PC game, and the graphics are quite impressive, even on the console. I remember buying Oblivion for my beast PC, back in the day, and running it at its top resolution, only to find out that the Xbox 360 also runs Oblivion at top resolution. In fact, Oblivion looked better on the Xbox than my PC…but some of that may be my fault.

    Dan:

    I was just making a leap when I compared the JP videogame to Skyrim. They’re both new games which will be released this month. One of them looks like a new game, one of them looks like it belongs on the PlayStation.

    No game looks as good as Jurassic Park, and, like PC games v. Console games, that gap will always exist, even if it becomes more shallow. However, many games look better than old movies like: Clash of the Titans (old one or the new one – Medusa looked like SHIT,) or The Mummy 2 (The Rockian King looked like SHIT.) It’s a standard that should be supported, even if it can’t be achieved. JP the Game falls short of just about every standard- visually.

    To be fair, the gameplay looks like it might be fun.

  5. Which JP game follows the exploits of the Triceratops? The sick one. I want to know why it was sick, and what became of it after the humans blunder away.

    Do any of them let you play as Samuel L. Jackson’s severed arm?

  6. I was a straight up Nintendo gangsta. Sonic wasn’t fit to lick Mario’s goomba stained shoes.

    Scott, you’re right, the gap between console and PC is shrinking, but that’s only when a developer knows how to take advantage of the hardware. It’s one reason I have a hard time with PC gaming. There are so many components to upgrade and then those components need constant software upgrades. Console gaming requires a one-time package purchase and then, due to the proliferation of online gaming, occasional patch downloads. I heard Arkham City looks beautiful on a PC, but I don’t have the gear for it.

    Batman is great.

    Wil, the triceratops was sick because it was eating a poisonous plant. Remember the “big pile of shit”? Oh how our young minds laughed at that line. After that, they probably shot it since no one knows how to treat a triceratops for diarrhea.

  7. Kosmo, they most certainly did NOT solve the riddle. Dr. Satler decided it was NOT a poisonous plant. That was her initial guess. The stool sample was inconclusive.

    I’m with Wil. But I want the JP Movie Poo and the Sick Triceratops Videogame Poo to have as narrow a graphical gap as possible.

  8. I looked it up, I was adding the berry discovery from the book that the movie omitted. Probably in hopes of creating the spin-off you suggested.

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